1. One year after the Bangladesh garment factory collapse, the Rana Plaza Donors Trust Fund is still $25 million short. They didn’t have a direct donation channel. So we built one.

    Donate here. We’ll match the first $10,000. 

    You can also show your support by wearing your clothes #InsideOut and sharing it on Instagram. Include the #InsideOut and #KnowYourFactories tag.

    Featured above we have @kimathomas, @cacahuete_sr, @brigaideirochoc, @rdgskll, @kessara, and @zobolondon.

  2. What do you know about your clothes?
Less than you think. A year ago today, the Rana Plaza garment factory collapsed in Dhaka, Bangladesh, killing 1,133 people. It was the largest accident in manufacturing history. 
Twenty-nine brands produced there. Brands we all know. How does something like this happen? And how does it never happen again? We think the answer is transparency.
Most of us are clueless about the manufacturing origins of the items we own. And labels tell only a small part of the story. At Everlane, we’re attempting to fill in that narrative. We do this by visiting and documenting all of our factories and sharing that information with you. It’s not a perfect system, but it helps create accountability. Maybe one day, customers will demand this kind of transparency and change the industry as a whole.
Donate now. We’ll match the first $10,000.

    What do you know about your clothes?

    Less than you think. A year ago today, the Rana Plaza garment factory collapsed in Dhaka, Bangladesh, killing 1,133 people. It was the largest accident in manufacturing history. 

    Twenty-nine brands produced there. Brands we all know. How does something like this happen? And how does it never happen again? We think the answer is transparency.

    Most of us are clueless about the manufacturing origins of the items we own. And labels tell only a small part of the story. At Everlane, we’re attempting to fill in that narrative. We do this by visiting and documenting all of our factories and sharing that information with you. It’s not a perfect system, but it helps create accountability. Maybe one day, customers will demand this kind of transparency and change the industry as a whole.

    Donate now. We’ll match the first $10,000.

  3. Take a look at this infographic and you won’t look at shirts the same again.

    Take a look at this infographic and you won’t look at shirts the same again.

  4. How much did it cost to make our Sleeveless Silk Blouse? This much.

    How much did it cost to make our Sleeveless Silk Blouse? This much.

  5. Italy cut the leather. We cut the markup. 

    Italy cut the leather. We cut the markup. 

  6. 
A number of folks have asked: “Why is your sandal $105?” We want to help explain how we work.
Everlane is not the cheapest option in the world, nor are we trying to be. Our goal is to make the best possible product. We find great factories, spend months on design, and launch only products that we think meet our values. For every product we make, we try to get it to consumers at the lowest possible price. Our markup is about 2.2x as compared to the retail industry’s traditional 5-8x. 
We could make a $65 sandal, but it wouldn’t meet our standards. So in this case, we sourced Italian leather and had these sandals handmade at a US factory that produces for one of the largest luxury houses in the world. In the end, it took fourteen people to make one sandal and cost us just under $50. In traditional retail, these would’ve sold for $250.

Best quality. Beautiful design. Lowest markup. 
That’s how Everlane works.

    A number of folks have asked: “Why is your sandal $105?” We want to help explain how we work.

    Everlane is not the cheapest option in the world, nor are we trying to be. Our goal is to make the best possible product. We find great factories, spend months on design, and launch only products that we think meet our values. For every product we make, we try to get it to consumers at the lowest possible price. Our markup is about 2.2x as compared to the retail industry’s traditional 5-8x.

    We could make a $65 sandal, but it wouldn’t meet our standards. So in this case, we sourced Italian leather and had these sandals handmade at a US factory that produces for one of the largest luxury houses in the world. In the end, it took fourteen people to make one sandal and cost us just under $50. In traditional retail, these would’ve sold for $250.

    Best quality. Beautiful design. Lowest markup.

    That’s how Everlane works.

  7. We sent our Oxford to a third-party agency to be tested on six standards: Dimensional Changes (shrinking) after Home Laundering and Dry Cleaning, Colorfastness to Crocking, Perspiration and Water, and Pilling Resistance. 

    Here is how it performed. 

  8. (Source: everlane.com)

  9. Oh my, it looks like we’ve stirred some controversy with our recent Making Of A Designer T-shirt infographic. At Well Spent, there’s an interesting debate underway among a group of respected retailers. This graphic was never intended as an attack on retailers (we love beautiful stores too), but an illustration of the costs behind making our T-shirts and how — when you’re online only — you can cut the markup expense associated with having locations.

    For those interested: Our T-shirts are cut, sewn, and dyed in Los Angeles, and the infographic reflects those made-in-LA numbers. We would have loved to weigh in, and are always happy to answer questions.

    (Source: everlane)