1. We sat down with American Express OPEN forum to discuss how keeping the customer experience in mind drives decisions at Everlane. 

    Read the full article here.

  2. Just as the Slow Food movement prizes practices that are gentle on the land and the body, a wave of labels and retailers are focusing on socially responsible methods. These companies appeal to the growing number of consumers who want to know what kind of impact their purchases will have—both on the environment and, now more than ever, on other human beings.

    — Everlane in this weekend’s Wall Street Journal.

  3. We started Everlane as outsiders. We had no idea what items cost and how the industry worked… We also found that many brands produce 95 percent of goods in Asia, but often try to hide the fact from consumers. They never list the country of origin on the website and they publish videos of Europe to create a false reality. We do the opposite. We try to find the best factory in the world for each product and we have no problems sharing that with the customer. We now produce in the US, China, Spain and Italy.

    — Michael Preysman on complete transparency from Ecosalon. Read the full article here.

  4. Ideas are a dime a dozen. It’s about the team. The two pieces of advice I’ve gotten are to hire people you enjoy spending time with and make work feel like play. We’ve done that as much as we can at Everlane, and it’s helped create a community.

    — Our CEO, Michael Preysman, no. 18 on Refinery29’s 30 Under 30 in San Francisco.

  5. A big day for our team: Everlane on the cover of The New York Times. 

    A big day for our team: Everlane on the cover of The New York Times

  6. The revolution that started in food is expanding to clothing: origins matter…”In the clothing industry, everybody wears it every day, but we have no idea where it comes from,” said Michael Preysman, Everlane’s chief executive and founder. “People are starting to slowly clue in to this notion of where products are made.”

    — From today’s New York Times article "Newest Front for Fair-Trade Movement Is Retail Clothing". 

  7. The problem with copycats is that honestly, they have no soul. It sounds silly to say that, but when you don’t have soul and you don’t have a reason for why you’re doing the things you’re doing, you’re always one step behind, and you never really connect with the consumer.

    — Our CEO Michael Preysman in TechCrunch on Everlane copycats. Watch the full interview here.

  8. Everlane is a clothing company that cuts costs to improve value, just as so many great modern fashion businesses have…Its promise to its customers is that, in cutting out the management and marketing tiers needed to operate at physical retail, it gives them clothes that ultimately work and look better for them at a better price. It feels like the future—and not un-coincidentally, like the best of the past too. In the U.K., until the 1950s, the average working man in Britain got all his shirts and clothes made-to-measure at his high-street tailor. That wasn’t because he was rich; it was because that was the best, most convenient way to make his budget and his outfit work for him.

    — Fast Company’s When New Companies Tap Timeless Values, New Customers Respond.

  9. "For offering members high-quality goods without the middleman. When the online clothier launched in November 2011, it began with a small run of t-shirts. But in just over a year, it has expanded its selection to include scarves, sweatshirts, ties, oxfords, and other items. By using a limited batch model, it keeps demand high. In 2012, the site grew to nearly half a million users."
Everlane as number five on Fast Company’s World’s Most Top 10 Most Innovative Companies in Retail. See the full list here. 

    "For offering members high-quality goods without the middleman. When the online clothier launched in November 2011, it began with a small run of t-shirts. But in just over a year, it has expanded its selection to include scarves, sweatshirts, ties, oxfords, and other items. By using a limited batch model, it keeps demand high. In 2012, the site grew to nearly half a million users."

    Everlane as number five on Fast Company’s World’s Most Top 10 Most Innovative Companies in Retail. See the full list here. 

  10. There is more and more focus today on the brand versus the product and the general complaint I hear is that people can’t find quality. What does quality even mean anymore?

    — Read about why we launched an At Cost Pop-Up shop in this LA Times article.

  11. On a mission to let you know you’ve been paying too much for your fashion staples.

    — Yep, sounds like us. Read more from Gear Patrol.

  12. There is a middle ground, where sustainability and affordability collide, and it’s bigger than we think it is.

    — Read more about how we think efficiency and sustainability can go hand in hand in this article from Ecosalon.

  13. We thought, ‘What would it mean to build a Ralph Lauren from scratch on the web and go straight to the consumer? We’re not going to be the cheapest price, but we won’t be the most expensive either. The clothing will be Barney’s quality at one-third the price.

    — Read more about how we do what we do in this Business Insider interview with Everlane founder Michael Preysman.

  14. Everlane’s emphasis on middleman-slashing affordability isn’t a race to the bottom line, though. Yes, they claim that they’ll never let either their basics or accessories tip over $100, but the yarn Everlane founders Michael Preysman and Jesse Farmer are most eager to spin is one of design-driven quality.

    — Read more in the SF Chronicle